Hiring For Culture…Should be your priority

Corporate Culture

a Great post from one of my terrific Talent Acquisition Specialists, Cindy Dale, at #FreemanCo …enjoy!

With the workplace constantly evolving, companies should think about hiring for cultural fit as much as or even more than technical skills. Recruiting qualified candidates with the technical skills needed for a specific job is usually the easy part. The hiring managers know the skills and can tell through an effective interview if they have the technical part of the job. However, determining how a candidate will fit into the organization’s culture is more challenging. The fit will be missing if a candidate’s values differ from those of the company. Let’s take a look at an example.

A couple of Freeman’s values are enthusiasm and performance excellence. Recruiting incorporates behavioral and attitudinal questions based on our values of enthusiasm and performance. This not only allows us to capture the candidate’s personality, but also places an emphasis on determining if our cultural values match the candidate’s values. For example, we ask, “Describe what motivates you to do your best every day?” Recruiters listen for answers around “the challenges of my job,” “my boss appreciating our work” or “my coworkers and team.” This gives us a better understanding of what the candidate is looking for in their next career opportunity and what Freeman can offer to that candidate then we have a great potential match. Would you hire someone that answered the question: “waking up,” “gotta eat” or “money?” Yes, we have heard those answers before.

Recruiting also partners with our hiring managers discussing the value of hiring for culture. Each branch and each department has its’ own unique culture but as mentioned above we share common values, vision, and purpose. The key is determining how the new employee would blend with the current team and match the company’s overall culture. Therefore, our team provides our hiring managers with questions based on our values, and we ask that they develop potential answers to ensure the candidates will fit into the branch/department’s culture.

On the flip side, candidates are beginning to ask a lot of detailed questions about our culture. Your careers site should include a section around company culture including quotes and pictures about employees or videos. Hiring managers should be prepared for questions around the organization’s culture. Job seekers want to find a great place to work just as much as the company wants to ensure they hire the right fit. It is up to the organization’s management to talk about it.

Our recruiting team and hiring managers are challenged now more than ever to incorporate cultural fit into potential new hires. If the cultural match isn’t there, employees will simply come to work and go through the motions. The employee will feel they are not valued as an employee, nor will they get involved with company activities that make the workplace a fun place to come to daily. Unfortunately, they will end up leaving within six months to a year.

A few other things to consider when recruiting for a cultural fit are, knowing your company and what it stands for, and incorporating those types of questions while interviewing a candidate. Determine which skills are truly needed and which skills are trainable. Always welcome internal referrals, because who better to know the culture than a current employee?

Remember, hiring someone with the technical skills may help fill a gap for a short term period, but hiring someone that is a cultural fit will result in a long term success. Cultural knowledge is crucial for a business to survive, and to thrive, within today’s business environment.

Cindy Dale is a Specialist in Regional Talent Acquisition at Freeman. Connect with her @cmdale12 on Twitter

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Social Media And Your Job Search – 5 Myths (And Truths) You Should Know

A great article by my colleague Lars Schmidt of @AmplifyTalent

Amplify Talent

The following is a post I contributed to Careerealism’s Professional Emancipation Project (P.E.P.)

There is a lot of discussion about how, where, and why one must use social media in today’s digital economy. It can be a bit overwhelming for some. The following myths and truths are intended to demystify some of the ways in which you can utilize social media as a job search resource.

Myth: You Must Use Social Media To Find A Job

Truth: Despite what many experts tell you, social media is not an absolute requirement for all jobs and careers. There are many fields where traditional job boards and resumes are still effective tools for finding your next job. Generally speaking, social media tends to be most effective as a job search tool in ‘corporate’ roles and careers where you have a cubicle, desk, or office.

Myth: You Must Build Your Personal Brand

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The Social Resume Infographic

The Social Resume Infographic

I am thinking that the online/paper resume used in our ATS will be archaic in 5 years. This is a great infographic.

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What are Hiring Managers Thinking?

Learn about infographics software.

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SuperRecruiter's Blog

The long and winding road of recruiting never surprises me.  Over the last 20 years I have watched it evolve from a paper pushing function into a sophisticated group of people finding fanatics.  Sourcing and talent networks/communitiesare at the heart of matter as companies begin growing again.  We are expected to keep up with best practices, latest trends, etc.

The expectations are not only coming from organizational leadership, but also from what Talent Leadership reads/hears about.   Unfortunately, the “doers”cannot keep up with the pace and do not know where to start.

When I spoke last Wednesday to a group of Recruiting Specialists, we discussed how to build successful talent networks.  It amazed me how many companies were still forbidding the use of social media to recruit talent because a policy was not developed.  What the what?!?!?!  There were also question about how to get their recruiters to engage in social…

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The Long and Winding Road of Recruiting

The long and winding road of recruiting never surprises me.  Over the last 20 years I have watched it evolve from a paper pushing function into a sophisticated group of people finding fanatics.  Sourcing and talent networks/communitiesare at the heart of matter as companies begin growing again.  We are expected to keep up with best practices, latest trends, etc.

The expectations are not only coming from organizational leadership, but also from what Talent Leadership reads/hears about.   Unfortunately, the “doers”cannot keep up with the pace and do not know where to start.

When I spoke last Wednesday to a group of Recruiting Specialists, we discussed how to build successful talent networks.  It amazed me how many companies were still forbidding the use of social media to recruit talent because a policy was not developed.  What the what?!?!?!  There were also question about how to get their recruiters to engage in social recruiting because they didn’t think it was a valuable use of time.  When someone asked, “how do I get my recruiters engaged in social recruiting?  Where do we start?”.   My answer (to myself)..”Really?”.  I was trying to think back on how I got started…i started playing around in twitter, Reading #mashable religiously, googling the topic, talking to my network and then began building from there. I even read a book by my friend Jessica Miller-Merrell called Tweet This!  Twitter for Business.  Go to blogging4jobs.com or tweet jessica Very basic but extremely helpful information on how to get started.  There is a little more to it than that, but all I thought was that as a Talent Function that we sure have quite a ways to go.  There is no end to this long road, but there are quite a few people that are sitting at mile maker 1 with those who jumped in 5 years ago and are further down the road at mile marker 25, 50, and some at 100.

Companies are saying “Don’t keep me waiting here, lead me to your door”.  As a talent leader you have to know where the door is to lead them there.

Take the poll and let me know where you are down the road.

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